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It was to be a long flight. Strangely, I always like to go to airports. In my mind, it has been associated with a new experience and jetting off on an adventure. And the best part of taking flights is that I enjoy travelling alone. Allowing myself to get lost and the satisfaction of figuring out the solution is part of my getting to know myself journey and a chance to strengthen my independent streak.

Although there is no sharing, no companions, I open myself up to chatting with new people along the way and strangers’ conversations are always stress-free and sets me off thinking about new ideas. I suppose this has to do with having zero expectations from a stranger and we tend to treat people we do not know very well with more civility and gratitude compared to people we are used to and familiar with.

This time round, on the eleven hour flight to Ho Chi Minh City, I have three seats all to myself. No chatting which suited my mood and despite the spacious area, I was unable to get much sleep in the middle of the day. In between watching about two and a half movies, I took an hour’s snooze and have read nearly one third of the articles in “The Economist”. This is the first time I have read the Economist and I have to admit that the articles area are thought-provoking indeed and it has inspired me enough to plan to read through all sections and bring home to share with my family. Despite having minimal background knowledge in politics, science, history and economy, the global coverage and the delivery style was perfect. It not only brought up controversial discussion points, the written opinions and questions even caused the subject of subscription to cross my mind. Coming from a person who has never thought of subscribing to digital content, this is a clear indicator of the published quality of articles.

Flying over India at the moment and counting down to less than four hours to the only stopover, I am looking forward to the next meal – the ‘breakfast’ to trick my body clock to fast forward by eight hours.

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