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Enthralled, pensive, riveted and absorbing.
I was totally engaged by Hattie Morahan’s portrayal of Noral in “A Doll’s House’. Showcased at Young Vic at in the vicinity of Waterloo, it was the first time I have witnessed a revolving set. Bedroom, living room, study and kitchen – as the house turns to the music and scene change, I saw precision executed at a perfect rhythm. Even as visitors arrive or left the house, the movement was in tune for the smooth entries and exits. The seamless transition made me wonder how many rehearsals were done to be able to deliver such a smooth performance.

The main character played by Morahan caught my attention from beginning to end. The pout of a child or simply the seductive smile or the mischievious glee in the eye – shows the emotion upheaval of a little girl forced to grow up by the change in events. Her dependence on her husband to her innocent nature leading to her confusion – slowly built up the suspense and height of the play. It burst out eventually and the awakening of her inner self in the last scene brought tears to my eyes. I was sad for her – that her bubble was burst and her life was not what she thought it was; sad for Torvald – that he perhaps realised that he might need to change but helpless when he realised it was too late.

The slamming of the door when Nora left dictated the finality of her decision and the lights dimmed as we see a tearing Norwegian husband sunk into despair. I could not resist reading the reviews from Telegraph, nor could I fight against wanting to know more from Wikipedia. Apparently it reflects woman’s right during the time period or it could also be just the basic human right to be able to do what one wanted.

A thought provoking piece of work – a husband viewing his wife as a possesssion in the 19th century; a woman’s ability to do things only with the permission of a man; a human limited opportunities to think on his own, and denied a right to their own views. As the team took their bows, I set home on a journey – lost in my own thoughts.

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